Secret Path (Raeann)

Three things I learned

  • That many children did try to escape the cruel mistreatment that they were suffering but were unsuccessful and when caught were punished even more harshly for trying to escape.
  • That Chanie never got to be a father. Though this isn’t a meaningful think to learn, I had never previously considered this. And to think that we lost a person before they even had a chance to become the person that they were meant to be is powerful and scary. Residential schools tried to wipe out their race.
  • Who’s telling the truth makes a difference in how we as Canadian’s understand and accept the information that we are getting. Many of the stories that came from Residential Schools have been known for longer then the TRC has existed, but because it was never mentioned in pop culture it was never known prior to the TRC existing.

Two things I found interesting

  • I find it interesting that many videos like this and the reconciliation documents are so new, most are only a few years old at most. Obviously Canada tried to hide this part of their past and was successful for a number of years before Indigenous people decided to make a change and get what was rightfully promised to them.
  • That the makers would choose to do songs to tell the story of one child’s journey back home. It is unique and creates a little bit of interpretation to occur so that we can understand what has happened to this person along the secret path back home and really understand the struggles that they have gone through just to try to get home, a place that was forced and beaten out of them.

One Question that I Still Have

How do we make our classroom a place that incorporates Indigenous teaching in our practices? What about the backlash that we might receive?

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2 Replies to “Secret Path (Raeann)”

  1. whether it is having posters, the way you talk, or incorporating indigenous views cross-curricular I think that is a good start to incorporating indigenous teaching. regarding the backlash comment, I don’t think it should matter if people backlash regarding this because 1: it is in the curriculum and 2: its part of Canadian history and the process of reconciliation.

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  2. Hey Raeann,

    I really connected with what you said “Who’s telling the truth makes a difference in how we as Canadian’s understand and accept the information that we are getting. Many of the stories that came from Residential Schools have been known for longer than the TRC has existed, but because it was never mentioned in pop culture it was never known prior to the TRC existing.” You are absolutely right, who’s telling the truth dose make a huge difference because it needs to be told how it was not sugar coated by media or by Canadians themselves. We need to hear the truth and it is okay to feel uncomfortable about it because pain makes everyone uncomfortable. We need more of these stories, we need to feel more, we need to listen compassionately but that’s the first step in reconciliation.

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